Olive Ridley eggs hatch in thousands in Ganjam

Olive Ridley eggs hatch in thousands in Ganjam

Thousands of hatchlings are coming out of the nests buried under sand on this coast to venture into the sea. The Rushikulya rookery coast near Berhampur city in Ganjam district of Odisha is a major mass nesting site for Olive ridley turtles in India. This year, over 3,85,000 mother turtles reached the coast to lay eggs. Each nest contains around 100 eggs. This means over three crore hatchlings are expected to come out of the nests. On an average, 80 hatchlings come out of each nest.

Olive Ridley, microstat

“As the rate of mortality among the hatchlings is so high, the Olive Ridley remains an endangered species,” Berhampur Divisional Forest Officer (DFO) Ashis Behera said.

Forest range officer Dilip Kumar Martha said the hatching had started in a small number of nests on April 2. The process picked up on the night of April 7 and is expected to last for the next five days. This year, hatching was delayed by a few days because of the rains on the night of April 2.

Bivash Pandav, a scientist of the Wildlife Institute of India, pointed to an interesting fact. The hatchlings come out of the sand 48 hours after they hatch. During this period, they remain under the sand, getting oxygen through the porous sand, their shells turning hard for them to cope with the condition outside.

The Hindu, Sib Kumar Das

 BERHAMPUR APRIL 10, 2017

Female elephant, man die in road mishap near Berhampur in Ganjam

A female wild elephant was killed in a road accident near Dimiria square on NH 16 under Khallikote police station limits near Berhampur city in Ganjam district of Odisha at late night on Saturday.

The carcass of the elephant being removed from NH 16 under Khallikote police station in Ganjam district on Sunday.- Photo: Special Arrangement

 The carcass of the elephant being removed from NH 16 under
Khallikote police station near Berhampur city in Ganjam district, Odisha
on Sunday.- Photo: Special Arrangement

According to police sources, a speeding pick-up van allegedly hit this wild elephant while the herd was crossing the highway. Speaking to The Hindu, Berhampur Divisional Forest Officer (DFO) S. S. Mishra said the herd had strayed into this region from Chandaka sanctuary and was staying in Karakhol forest of Khallikote forest range. At regular intervals this herd was crossing the highway to reach the coast of Chilika lake and returning back after a few days. During their regular travels forest officials monitor their journey for the safe crossing of the highway. On Saturday night also this herd was crossing the highway at dead of night and forest officials despite darkness had stopped trucks on the highway. But a speeding pick-up van ignored the hand signals of forest officials and hit the elephant.

The female pachyderm had received serious injuries and had been thrown over 50 feet away. She had fallen into a ditch and could not come out and died there. The vehicle also caught fire and forest officials at the spot doused it with the ice loaded in it. Three persons in the vehicle were seriously injured. They were rushed to MKCG medical college and hospital in Berhampur. One of them named Pandav Palai (35) died. The other two Prakash Biswal, who was driving the van, and Amina Jena had to be shifted to Cuttack as their condition deteriorated. Forest officials reached the spot in the morning and seized the body of the elephant.

Palai and the other injured are from Krushnaprasad police station area of Puri district. On Saturday night they had come to Balugaon with a load of prawn and were returning with a load of ice meant for fish preservation. During their return journey they met with the accident.

The region where this accident occurred is an elephant corridor. On December 29, 2012, night five female elephants had been killed when speeding Chennai-bound Coromandel Express had collided with the herd in this region between Rambha and Huma railway stations.

BERHAMPUR, September 28, 2015