Indian National Congress Sessions from its inception

first_indian_national_congress_1885


Indian National Congress Sessions from its inception 

From its foundation on 28 December 1885 by A.O. Hume, until the time India gained its independence on 15 August 1947, the Indian National Congress was considered to be the largest and most prominent Indian public organization, as well as the central and defining influence of the long Indian Independence Movement.

Retired British Indian Civil Service (ICS) officer Allan Octavian Hume founded the Indian National Congress (A political party of India, to Free India from the British Colonial rule) in order to form a platform for civil and political dialogue among educated Indians. After the Indian Rebellion of 1857, control of India was transferred from the East India Company to the British Empire. British-controlled India, known as the British Raj, or just the Raj, worked to try to support and justify its governance of India with the aid of English-educated Indians, who tended to more familiar with and friendly to British culture and political thinking. Ironically, a few of the reasons that the Congress grew and survived, particularly in the 19th century era of undisputed British dominance or hegemony, was through the patronage of British authorities and the rising class of Indians and Anglo-Indians educated in the English language-based British tradition.

first_indian_national_congress_1885

On 28 December 1885, 72 social reformers, journalists and lawyers congregated for the first session of the Indian National Union at Gokuldas Tejpal Sanskrit College, Bombay; the conference was renamed as the Indian National Congress. It took place under the leadership of  Womesh Chandra Bonnerjee.

The second session of the Congress took place under the leadership of Dadabhai Naoroji on December 27, 1886 in Calcutta. The number of delegates had increased to 434. Towards the end of the session, the Congress decided to set up Provincial Congress Committees across the country.

The Post Liberalization Era (1990-2018)

The Post Independence Era (1947-1990)

The Pre Independence Era (1900-1947)